Topic: Public Health Campaigns

Legitimizing the Social Sciences: The Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial in the 1920s

What began as a philanthropic fund to honor its namesake became an early force in the social sciences.

The Rockefeller Foundation’s 20th-Century Global Fight Against Disease

Programs designed to build public health infrastructure, eradicate disease, and increase access to healthcare have formed the core of more than a hundred years of one foundation’s strategy.

Eradication or Control? The Rockefeller Foundation’s Global Anti-Malaria Campaigns

A foundation set on eradicating mosquito-born diseases had to accept that disease control was good enough.

Photo of Hillcrest, the home of the Rockefeller Archive Center

New Research: Public Health in Haiti, the Green Revolution, US-China Relations, and Law of the Sea

This edition of our monthly series features new work on the history of agribusiness, international law, diplomatic relations, and tropical disease control.

Timeline: American Foundations and the History of Public Health

Key points in the history of American foundations’ engagement with public health.

Photo of Hillcrest, the home of the Rockefeller Archive Center

New Research: China, Government Efficiency, Public Health, and Cultural Diplomacy

Research reports drawing on several Rockefeller Archive Center collections span continents, disciplines, and eras.

Sour Milk: Preventing Infant Mortality with Public Health

Philanthropy’s role in cleaning up the milk supply prompted better federal food safety protections.

Public Health: How the Fight Against Hookworm Helped Build a System

A hundred years ago, hookworm disease was an epidemic across the US South. Northern philanthropy tried to help.

Cover Your Mouth: Controlling an Epidemic Through Hygiene

Century-old tips to prevent infection still make sense today.

Photo Essay: The Rockefeller Sanitary Commission and the South

How battling hookworm on rural farms laid the groundwork for a global public health system.